Teacher’s Corner


Teachers, this is your place.

Teachers, you can use this blog in classrooms. Here are two ideas about how.

1. For middle or high school parenting or child development courses:

  • Use the blog for discussion topics
  • Require students to research the topics and agree or disagree with what the blog is suggesting.

2. For all courses, especially English Language Arts:

  • Use the blog for writing prompts for paragraphs, theme papers, journal entries, class starters, etc. Have students read the blog and respond to:
    • Do you agree with what is being said about kids? Do kids really act, think or feel that way?
    • Do you agree with what is being said about parents, grandparents, teachers and child caregivers? Do or should they act, think or feel that way?
    • What would be your advice on this topic?
    • What was left out of this article?
    • If you were a parent, would you use any of this information? How?

 3.   Have students read the featured book to real preschool or kindergarten children and write about their experience.

Why can this blog be a useful teaching tool?

  • Students that see connections between their coursework and their lives do better in school.
  • Most students will either be parents one day or have children in their lives that they care about, so the topical information can help them build their knowledge about children and parenting and develop a positive image of the type of parenting they want to do.
  • The new core literacy standards adopted by most states call for frequent writing in all courses.
  • Newly developed end-of-course assessments to be used by many states will require that students demonstrate that they can think critically. These prompts help students practice critical thinking.
  • Newly developed end-of-course assessments to be used by many states will require that students demonstrate that they can analyze what they read. These prompts help students practice analysis.

Teachers, send me descriptions of any other effective ways you come up with to use the blog. I would love to share them with other teachers. Be sure to give me your name and location if you want credit for your ideas.

“Teacher’s Corner” is on summer break. It will return on August 7, 2017 – just in time for planning the new school year or a new adult parenting education series.

Check out these writing prompts and discussion topics:

Three Things to Know About Students Who Say “No.”

Three Things to Know About Students Who Say “No.”

Growing Up Can Be Hard for Students.

Three Things to Know about Making Amends.

When Students Mess Up.

Three Ways to Makes Students Feel Important.

Five Things to Know about Students Becoming Stars.

Four Ways to Stay on Track with Classroom Discipline.

Four Things That Make Discipline in the Classroom Work.

Six Things You Should Know about Logical Consequences in Your Classroom.

Five Things You Should Know about Natural Consequences in Your Classroom.

Four Things to Say to Your Students.

What Messages Are in Your Students’ Heads?

Give Your Students a Double Valentine This Year.

What Would Teaching Be Like If …?

Four “Old” Decisions Your Students Have Made.

Four Things Your Students Want to Know.

Three Things Not to Do As a Teacher.

Do Your Students Have High Self-Esteem?

How Kids Learn a Skill.

One Way Kids Grow Up: Exploration.

Love with No Strings Attached.

Being the Center of the Universe.

All About Monsters.

Learning to Wait.

Sneaky or Clever, Which Is It?

Lessons Learned about Back-to-School.

Becoming a Lovable and Capable Prince or Princess.

Your Child’s Special Talents, Part 1 and Part 2 and Part 3.

Grandparent Greatness.

When a Kid Gets Hurt.

Make-Believe and Funny: Two Good Things.

The Importance of Storytelling.

Kids Need to DO Things, Part 1 and Part 2.

Holiday Traditions Revisited.

Holiday Gift Ideas Revisited.

Birthday Parties, Part 1 and Part 2.

Kids Keeping Track of Their Things.

Kids and Pets: More about Responsibility, Love, Independence, and Loss.

Kids and Pets: The Basics.

What You Need to Know about an Angry Child, Part 1 and Part 2.

Meet Kids Where They Are.

When Are Kids Old Enough?

Making Children Feel Safe and Important, Part 1 and Part 2.

The Benefits of Art, Choices, and Discipline: Part I and Part II and Part III.

Getting Kids to Sleep.

Why Grandparents Are Important.

Children and Loss ( of special people or special things).

Fighting for Attention.

That Special Gift – Part 1 and Part 2.

Fear Is Not All Bad.

Dads Are So Important!

Love Your Kids No Matter What – Part 1  and Part 2.

First Days of School.

What it Means When Children Say “No!”

Teaching Kids to Wait – Part1 and Part 2.

Growing Up Is Hard to Do – Part 1 and Part 2.

Your Child is a Star!

Sticking to the Rules.

CAUTION

When kids are asked to write or talk about families, they can get too personal and provide “TMI” as the kids say (too much information).  Talking or writing about their own families can be too difficult for some kids. Here are some suggestions for writing and talking about families and still keeping kids in a comfortable, healthy zone.
  • Be aware of and follow your school’s policies regarding students being required to write or talk about their own families.
  • Assure students that journal entries are not for classroom sharing.  And, for that reason, use the prompts that kids are likely to get more personal about as journal writing assignments.  Use broader, more objective prompts for theme papers and other writing assignments that are not considered private.
  • Invite students to write about a “fictional” family, write in the third person, make up their examples and use no names.

Why should you use this blog in your classroom?

  • Students that see connections between their coursework and real experiences do better in school.
  • Most students will either be parents one day or have children in their lives that they care about, so the topical information can help them build their knowledge about children and parenting and develop a positive image of the type of parenting they want to do.
  • New core literacy standards adopted by most states call for frequent writing in all courses.
  • New end-of-course assessments adopted by many states will require that students demonstrate that they can think critically. These prompts help students practice critical thinking.
  • New end-of-course assessments adopted by many states will require that students demonstrate that they can analyze what they read.  These prompts help students practice analysis.

10 thoughts on “Teacher’s Corner

  1. Pingback: Sticking to the Rules | Picture Book Parenting

  2. Pingback: Your Child is a Star! | Picture Book Parenting

  3. Pingback: Growing Up is Hard to Do! | Picture Book Parenting

  4. Pingback: Growing Up is Hard to Do! – Part 2 | Picture Book Parenting

  5. Pingback: Teaching Kids to Wait – Part 1 | Picture Book Parenting

  6. Pingback: Teaching Kids to Wait – Part 2 | Picture Book Parenting

  7. Pingback: What it Means When Children Say “No!” | Picture Book Parenting

  8. Pingback: First Days of School. | Picture Book Parenting

  9. Pingback: Love Your Kids No Matter What, Part 1 | Picture Book Parenting

  10. Pingback: Love Your Kids No Matter What, Part 2 | Picture Book Parenting

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