PICTURE BOOK CLUB – WEEK EIGHT


Welcome to PICTURE BOOK CLUB – WEEK EIGHT
How to participate in Picture Book Club …
  1. Get the suggested books from your library or bookstore (local or online). See PICTURE BOOK CLUB BOOK LIST for the complete list of books for each week.
  2. Before reading each of the weekly books to your child, READ FIRST “What Adults Can Learn from This Story.”
  3. Read one or both books to your child as many times through the week as your child wants to hear them and you have time to read.
  4. Consider doing whatever activities you think are appropriate for the age and maturity of your child from “Make This Story Come Alive for Your Child.”

WE WELCOME FEEDBACK ABOUT YOUR PARTICIPATION. YOU CAN LEAVE A COMMENT BY USING THE “WHAT DO YOU THINK?” BUTTON AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS POST.


OLIVER AND HIS ALLIGATOR by Paul Schmid
(a story about school fears)
In OLIVER AND HIS ALLIGATOR, Oliver’s “… brave wasn’t nearly as big as he needed it to be.”  He took an alligator to school with him “just in case.” Each time Oliver said, “Munch. Munch!” the alligator swallowed the person or thing Oliver was afraid of. After everybody and everything had been munched, Oliver wasn’t afraid anymore, but he was bored. Oliver could hear fun and activity inside the alligator, so he announced, “Munch, munch!”  and joined the fun at his first day of school – inside the alligator.
“What Adults Can Learn from This Story …”
  • Most children have a natural curiosity and excitement about school. It represents growing
    up and exploring new things. However, fears can undermine the good things about school. Adults need to let kids know it is OK to be afraid, others are probably afraid too, and with each day they bravely go to school their fears will get less and less.
  • Although your child is working on growing up and being brave, he still may need to act “young” at times. He might want to be cuddled, have a special blanket or stuffed animal, to play with old toys he liked when he was younger, have a tantrum or whine about things, or have you do things for him that he usually does for himself (for example, fix him a snack and deliver it to him).
  • School does not allow for having favorite things with you all day. In addition to having fears, your child may be feeling sad or mad about not having her favorite things. Adults can help by:
    • Assuring her that her special things will be in their usual place waiting for her return home.
    • Capturing a favorite daytime TV show on the DVR for watching together at home later.
    • Planning special one-on-one time with Mom or Dad in the evening.
    • Arranging for playtime with non-school friends after school.
“Make this Story Come Alive for Your Child …”
  • Ask your child if he wishes he had an alligator to take to school with him? Is there something else he wishes he could take to school?
  • Play a game of “School Is Awesome Because …” Take turns naming great things about school (making new friends, having fun at recess, feeling grown-up).
  • Tell your child about things you remember about your “first days.” They might be school days, first days on a job, or even first days after you brought her home from the hospital when she was born. Share what helped you feel less afraid.
  • Ask your child if he can think of things that would help him feel less afraid during those first days at school.

STOP THIEF! by Adam J. B. Lane
(a story about growing up)
In STOP THIEF! Randall stood on his chair to announce loudly, “I am a big boy now!” – no tucking him in at bedtime, no kisses and hugs, no Mr. Pigglesworth, his stuffed pig. Randall went on an adventuresome chase when a thief stole his stuffed pig. He kept yelling “Stop Thief!” but what he meant was, “Don’t steal my baby things just so I can be a grown-up hero.” In the end Randall was able to catch the thief and save both the thief and his stuffed pig. Despite the big fuss over Randall as the boy hero,  “… Randall just wanted to go home to bed. …Randall’s parents carried him … tucked him in…kissed him…with Mr. Pigglesworth right beside him.… And even though he was certainly a big boy now, that was just what he wanted.”
“What Adults Can Learn from This Story …”
  • Imagine an adult who wants an offered promotion, but also wants more family time. Children are also faced with wanting two things at one time – to be more in charge of themselves (grown-up) and be super-heroes but also want their favorite things and to be cuddled and taken care of.
  • Going to school means giving up favorite things (pacifier, blanket, beloved stuffed animal, favorite TV show, time with Mom). Realizing this can help adults deal with a child’s fussiness about going to school and with difficult re-entry when coming home.
“Make this Story Come Alive for Your Child …”
  • When children are tired they often will give in to listening or accepting take-care-of-me words and actions when they won’t during the day while they are full of energy and focused on more grown-up things. Use bedtime to offer your child the comforts he liked when he was younger (stroking an arm, telling him how much he is loved, remembering fun times).
  • Ask your child if there are things she misses while she is at school or daycare? Tell her you are glad to know about those things so you can make sure they are ready and waiting for her when she returns – or maybe even in the car at pick-up time.
  • Wrestling and rough house once in a while. These are great substitutes for open affection for kids not into hugging and snuggling. Just make sure that both of you are having fun. If only one of you is enjoying the activity, stop and try later. Start by asking if the child wants to play and agree on a signal that both of you will use to say it’s time to stop.

 

Past PICTURE BOOK CLUB postings:
PICTURE BOOK CLUB – WEEK ONE
PICTURE BOOK CLUB – WEEK TWO
PICTURE BOOK CLUB – WEEK THREE
PICTURE BOOK CLUB – WEEK FOUR
PICTURE BOOK CLUB – WEEK FIVE
PICTURE BOOK CLUB – WEEK SIX
PICTURE BOOK CLUB – WEEK SEVEN

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